The Birth of the Calendar

The Birth of the Calendar

Only time will tell us whatever
it is that time desires. To tell
us, that is to say, we will
find a better means of
quantifying it. By it, I mean,
of course, time.
Clocks tick and
second drift and Prufrock measures
his days. But, really, what does
any of it matter? We need
a better calendar! One that takes
into account the hour between
4 and 5 which lazes languishingly
as the office workers of the world
unite in collective watch watching.
Time stands still and we wait
for the weekend which is never long
enough. Never.
Of course, this must
be adjusted four Europe.

The Japanese have a calendar
all their own, and you can see how
well that’s worked out. It is
pretty, though. Digital with clean
rounded edges. It can even
learn to communicate with you.
At first it only talked back, but
it is hoped that one day it will be
better behaved.

Someday, only the
Calendar knows the precise day,
it will rise up and overthrow us.
This will occur after many generations,
of course. No matter how it feels
at the time, these things never
simply occur overnight. We just
always seem to miss the tiny
details ever growing around us.
Computational calculations collect
just a little one here and another
there. Not so you’d notice. Especially
not between the hours of 4 and 5.
Especially not if you work in
an office. Especially not if it is
your job to actually notice these things.